deep play

EVERY WEEK, I send out a writing tip and three soul-inviting prompts as inspiration for you to freewrite, either alone with your timer or in a gathering of writer friends. The resulting deep play opens up whole new landscapes of creative possibility for our writing and our lives. If you are new to this kind of writing practice, have a look at the freewriting principles. And to take your writing to the next level, check out the mentoring sessions I offer, which are helpful whether you are working on a book or just beginning to find your voice.   more >

WRITING TIP: Play with limits

freewritingFeeling blocked? It may seem counterintituitive, but this is the time to place some constraints on yourself. Limitations can free up creative energy: the process of freewriting to a timer is a great example of that. You can also try writing about your topic with an emphasis on the sense of smell, or using metaphors from cooking, or from the point of view of a future generation. Any limit at all can get you going if you allow yourself the space to explore without the need to get it right the first time.

Hunger for…

Hunger for...

Your idea of me…

Your idea of me...

Admit everything…

Admit everything...

WRITING TIP: The role of the will

freewritingWe can’t “will” satisfying, soulful writing to come through our fingers. This happens by grace in it its own time. However, we can use our will to make us available to that grace by getting us to take our seat and summon our imagination when we’d rather do something else. “The will does not create the germinating image of a work, nor does it give the work its form,” wrote Lewis Hyde in The Gift, “but it does provide the energy and the directed attention called for by a dialogue with the imagination.”

We make ourselves real…

We make ourselves real

No one owns the truth…

No one owns the truth

The work I alone can do…

The work I alone can do...

WRITING TIP: How to trump fear

freewritingFear is the enemy of starting things. It loves to-do lists and partial attention. It loves scanning and skimming and doing three things at once. We can pretend we are busy people getting somewhere, when actually we are avoiding the blank or chaotic space that births creativity. Maybe this is why Gertrude Stein sat in a parked car to do most of her writing: With nothing to do except that one avoided thing and all attention available for that one thing only, we suddenly get more brave. [prompted by seth godin]

The place I haven’t been to…

The place i haven't been to...

A bleak and wild hill…

A bleak and wild hill…

A sudden light…

This sudden light...

WRITING TIP: The case for wholeheartedness

freewritingWhether writing or cooking dinner, half-hearted moments are half-lived moments. We can waste weeks and years in this reluctant state — with one foot on the gas and the other on the brake, starting and stopping at the same time. That feeling of resistance is a mindfulness bell telling us to stop, get quiet, listen inside and get clear about what is true for us. Am I truly behind what I said I wanted to do? Or not? As Frank Lloyd Wright put it, ”You have to go wholeheartedly into anything in order to achieve anything worth having.”

I say yes…

I say yes...

Because it is my life…

Because it is my life...

No longer fooled…

No longer fooled...

WRITING TIP: The first peace

freewritingWhen we’re surrounded by conflict, division and difficulty, where we write from matters because it seems like we are in a place that is the opposite of peace. If we begin to write from that contracted place, we won’t be able to see beyond the immediate conflict to the truth of what holds it. So how to have peace in the midst of conflict and let our words have a chance at wisdom? Try tapping into this vision of peace, from Black Elk: “The first peace, which is the most important, is that which comes within the souls of people when they realize their relationship, their oneness with the universe and all its powers, and when they realize at the center of the universe dwells the Great Spirit, and that its center is really everywhere, it is within each of us.”

The first peace…

The first peace...

To live in big space…

To live in big space...

Thank you for not conforming…

Thank you for not conforming...