deep play

EVERY WEEK, I send out a writing tip and three soul-inviting prompts as inspiration for you to freewrite, either alone with your timer or in a gathering of writer friends. The resulting deep play opens up whole new landscapes of creative possibility for our writing and our lives. If you are new to this kind of writing practice, have a look at the freewriting principles. And to take your writing to the next level, check out the mentoring sessions I offer, which are helpful whether you are working on a book or just beginning to find your voice.   more >

WRITING TIP: Up your creativity by 50 percent

Here’s how to up your creativity by 50 percent: Get out in nature and walk! In recent study, those who spent four days hiking without electronic devices scored nearly 50 percent higher on creativity tests than the control group. Hint: In lieu of electronics, bring along a high-touch notebook and a pen that feels good in your hand. Stop along the way, smell the smells and write from that. Stop a little further, notice what you hear and write from that. Sit with a tree in silence and then write what the tree tells you. There are wild and juicy worlds beyond all the pixels and vibrating phones.

Devotion is a wild region…

Devotion is a wild region...

Inside the inside…

Inside the inside...

The path made by walking…

The path made by walking...

WRITING TIP: Cultivate uncommon sense

In a world mesmerized by pragmatism, its easy to forget that new insights cannot emerge from well-worn paths of thinking. But to forge new paths, we have to be willing to fail — something our success-hungry culture abhors. To take the safe and common road in our writing or our lives will bring only common results, when what the world really needs is a fresh take on tired arguments and daring new perspectives that reveal hidden truths. Said Oscar Wilde: “Nowadays most people die of a sort of creeping common sense, and discover when it is too late that the only things one never regrets are one’s mistakes.” You might use his words as inspiration to loosen the grip of your usual thinking and write freely to discover something new, instead of using the written word to explain what you think you already know.

We are so not ever alone…

We are so not ever alone...

Dark bells ring…

Dark bells ring...

Why didn’t someone tell me…

Why didn't someone tell me...

WRITING TIP: Writing is what makes a writer

Author Anne Rice gives this advice for those who want to be writers: “If you want to be a writer, write. Write and write and write. If you stop, start again. Save everything that you write. If you feel blocked, write through it until you feel your creative juices flowing again. Write. Writing is what makes a writer, nothing more and nothing less. — Ignore critics. Critics are a dime a dozen. Anybody can be a critic. Writers are priceless. —- Go where the pleasure is in your writing. Go where the pain is. Write the book you would like to read. Write the book you have been trying to find but have not found. But write. And remember, there are no rules for our profession. Ignore rules. Ignore what I say here if it doesn’t help you. Do it your own way. — Every writer knows fear and discouragement. Just write. — The world is crying for new writing. It is crying for fresh and original voices and new characters and new stories. If you won’t write the classics of tomorrow, well, we will not have any.” 

Happy uncertainty…

Happy uncertainty,,,

Curious about the clouds…

Curious about the clouds...

A new freedom…

A new freedom...

WRITING TIP: You need only begin

Author Thomas Kenneally has this advice for those who want to write: “My aphorism is ‘only begin.’ It’s hard to do if you have a job, but if you can find the time to write a number of days or nights a week, even if it’s just five hundred words – that process will help free up your subconscious…. You’ve got to use your conscious mind to refine it all, but a lot of good material comes from the unconscious, and to engage the unconscious you have to write a number of times a week to get the sub-conscious stirred up. I’ve got this idea that all the great stories are in our subconscious somewhere and they’ll come out if only we give them a chance. Getting it published in the present climate is the heartbreak, but there’s always Amazon.”

The designer mind…

The designer mind...

That’s not helping…

That's not helping...

The world tips toward wholeness…

The world tips toward wholeness...

WRITING TIP: How to add richness to your writing

Allowing ourselves to deeply feel what it is we’re writing about brings depth and humanity to our work and our life. Pleasurable or painful, our feelings give life richness, whether its joy at the smell of the rain, grief over the loss of the rainforest, or fear at the illness of someone we love. “We can separate artistic pain, the experience of feeling deeply, from leading a painful life,” says author Dorthe Nors. “One is not a requirement for the other. But it is the job of the artist to sit with our feelings, to be receptive to them, to examine them, turn them into narrative or paint or film.” To make contact with what you’re feeling, even if you are just doing a 10-minute freewrite, start with attention on your breath and inner sensation, where feeling resides. Then put pen to paper.

A writing gathering of playful depth

We will tap into the mind of meditation to access the natural stream of our expression. May 30 from 10-5pm at Sukhasiddhi, a Buddhist meditation center in Fairfax, California. more information

What is real begins in hiding…

What is real begins in hiding...

Emotion made of smoke…

Emotion made of smoke...

This grief that I carry…

This grief I carry...

WRITING TIP: Get good at suspending judgment

“You cannot be judging yourself as you write the first draft,” says author Jane Smiley. “You want to harness that unexpected energy, and you don’t want to limit the possibilities of exploration. You don’t know what you’re writing until it’s done. So if a draft is 500 pages long, you have to suspend judgment for months. It takes effort to be good at suspending at judgment, to give the images and story priority over your ideas. But you keep going, casting about for the next sentence.” This is one of the main skills you develop by doing freewrites — suspending judgment over 10 or 30 minutes until the timer goes off. Such practice will serve you well when you are ready to work on something longer. And you just might find the ability to suspend judgment creeping over into other aspects of your life, opening up possibilities where before there was a brick wall.

This space that I am…

This space that I am...

The stone tells me…

The stone tells me...

Without an agenda…

Without an agenda...

WRITING TIP: Please yourself, not your “audience”

In the pragmatic view, thinking first of your audience when you write will give your work focus, but unless you plan to write exclusively for pre-school children or neuroscientists, this isn’t as good an idea as it might seem at first glance. Michael Ondaatje, author of The English Patient, has this to say about it: “Very early on in my writing life I realized that if you’re going to write, the last thing you should think about is an audience. Otherwise you’re going to give the audience what they want as opposed to what you want to do or discover. The act of writing is so difficult anyway that you don’t want to add to it the imagined sense of five hundred people in a theater listening to you.”

In retreat from my name…

In retreat from my name...

i am the water…

I am the water...

Bursting is our natural state…

Bursting is our natural state...

WRITING TIP: Find the sweet spot between fact and feeling

“Attention without feeling is only a report,” said poet Mary Oliver. Sometimes when we free write, the first thing that pours through might be just such a report, or it might be a flood of feeling. It can be interesting to go back to your writings, without judgment, and see which side you leaned toward. Is what you’ve written so matter-of-fact that on re-reading, it leaves you unmoved? Are you feeling drawn to describe and spell out the feelings associated with this piece? Does it evoke feeling without needing to be explicit? Or is it all feeling without enough context and perspective to make sense of it? Only you know whether your attention has gone too far into the facts or too far into the feeling to be deeply satisfying to your heart. This doesn’t make the writing wrong or bad — rather, it opens a doorway and points us to a deepening avenue of exploration.

To live out loud…

To live out loud...

It would surprise my friends to know…

it would surprise my friends to know...

My father’s face…

My father's face...

WRITING TIP: How to carve out the time to write

It’s hard to write on a computer — at least for me, it is a distraction machine. Author David Mitchell gives this advice for how to make writing a priority in the face of constant temptations to distraction:

1: Neglect everything else.

2: Get disciplined. Learn to rush to your laptop and open it up. Open the file without asking yourself if you’re in the mood, without thinking about anything else. Just open the file: and then you’re safe. Once the words are on the screen, that becomes your distraction. The moment you think okay, it’s work time, and face down the words, you rush past all the other things asking for your attention

3: Keep the Apple homepage, because it’s rather boring. If your homepage is the website of your favorite newspaper, you’ve had it.

Writing Deep & Wide: A day-long retreat

May 30, 2015 from 10am to 5pm
at Sukhasiddhi Foundation, Fairfax, California

Come immerse yourself in writing as deep play and use the mind of meditation to access the natural stream of your expression. In an atmosphere of warmth and non-judgement, free of critical evaluation, we will create a welcoming space to be daring and self-revealing, loosening the grip of our critical minds so that expression can flow freely, which is one of the ultimate goals of meditation. As we alternate writing and reading aloud, we will cultivate mindful attention to our bodies and senses to help us locate a source of expression beyond the discursive mind. Timed free writes from evocative prompts will guide the process, helping us access a range of inner and outer, personal and transpersonal aspects of reality. Listening to our words beside the raw expression of others, the preciousness of each person’s unique mind, rhythms and voice will become apparent. Guidance for how to continue this process beyond the day-long will be provided. Please bring a notebook and pen. Bag lunch recommended. Sliding scale: $80-$60-$40. Click here to register.

Something very old has been forgotten…

Something very old has been forgotten...

He is a she and an us…

He is a she and an us...

Ready to listen enough…

Ready to listen enough...

WRITING TIP: Create a dream that others can enter

Writing is at its essence about creating for another being an experience that lives in the realm of memory and dream. It is helpful to remember this, and to keep in mind that in our stories, we dream our souls and in doing so, invite others to do the same. “The essence of our art lies in creating a lingering dream, good or bad, that other souls can enter,” wrote Marilyn Robinson in The World Split Open. “Dreaming one’s soul into another’s is an urgent business of the human mind: the dreaming itself, not whatever agenda can supposedly be extracted from it. As art, it plays on the nerves and the senses like a dream. It unfolds over time like a dream. It makes its own often disturbing and often inexplicable appeal to memory and emotion, creating itself again in the consciousness of the reader or hearer.”

Little things make me glad…

Little things make me glad...

Pushed into the stretch zone…

Pushed into the stretch zone...

Seen in a dream…

Seen in a dream...