deep play

EVERY WEEK, I send out a writing tip and three soul-inviting prompts as inspiration for you to freewrite, either alone with your timer or in a gathering of writer friends. The resulting deep play opens up whole new landscapes of creative possibility for our writing and our lives. If you are new to this kind of writing practice, have a look at the freewriting principles. And to take your writing to the next level, check out the mentoring sessions I offer, which are helpful whether you are working on a book or just beginning to find your voice.   more >

WRITING TIP: How to trump fear

freewritingFear is the enemy of starting things. It loves to-do lists and partial attention. It loves scanning and skimming and doing three things at once. We can pretend we are busy people getting somewhere, when actually we are avoiding the blank or chaotic space that births creativity. Maybe this is why Gertrude Stein sat in a parked car to do most of her writing: With nothing to do except that one avoided thing and all attention available for that one thing only, we suddenly get more brave. [prompted by seth godin]

The place I haven’t been to…

The place i haven't been to...

A bleak and wild hill…

A bleak and wild hill…

A sudden light…

This sudden light...

WRITING TIP: The case for wholeheartedness

freewritingWhether writing or cooking dinner, half-hearted moments are half-lived moments. We can waste weeks and years in this reluctant state — with one foot on the gas and the other on the brake, starting and stopping at the same time. That feeling of resistance is a mindfulness bell telling us to stop, get quiet, listen inside and get clear about what is true for us. Am I truly behind what I said I wanted to do? Or not? As Frank Lloyd Wright put it, ”You have to go wholeheartedly into anything in order to achieve anything worth having.”

I say yes…

I say yes...

Because it is my life…

Because it is my life...

No longer fooled…

No longer fooled...

WRITING TIP: The first peace

freewritingWhen we’re surrounded by conflict, division and difficulty, where we write from matters because it seems like we are in a place that is the opposite of peace. If we begin to write from that contracted place, we won’t be able to see beyond the immediate conflict to the truth of what holds it. So how to have peace in the midst of conflict and let our words have a chance at wisdom? Try tapping into this vision of peace, from Black Elk: “The first peace, which is the most important, is that which comes within the souls of people when they realize their relationship, their oneness with the universe and all its powers, and when they realize at the center of the universe dwells the Great Spirit, and that its center is really everywhere, it is within each of us.”

The first peace…

The first peace...

To live in big space…

To live in big space...

Thank you for not conforming…

Thank you for not conforming...

WRITING TIP: Leave your reality

freewritingDoes your life — and thereby, your writing — feel too small and tight? To write your way out of it, try leaving your little reality: In a remote village headed up the Mahakan river in Borneo, there lives a family embedded in an ancient culture, embedded in a forest. They don’t want packaged snack foods, or a new laptop. Instead of shopping, they sing. Instead of watching movies, they tend seedlings of endangered trees to replant their ancestral forest, which is being bulldozed for palm oil, but their connection to a reality larger than this day, year, or lifetime allows for a quiet joy and resilience in these hard times. There are more ways to live than our eyes made narrow by conditioning can see. Opening to other realities opens our writing — and our lives — to new forms that might suit us far better than the ones we’ve been groomed for.

Trees please forgive us…

Try listening to this beautiful chant of the poem “Trees Please” by Rachel Bagby while you do this freewrite.
trees please

Breaking away…

Breaking away...

Embedded in a forest…

Try watching this powerful video before doing this freewrite.
Embedded in a forest...

WRITING TIP: Everything is more beautiful because we’re doomed

freewritingIn the Iliad, Homer wrote: “The gods envy us. They envy us because we’re mortal, because any moment may be our last. Everything is more beautiful because we’re doomed. You will never be lovelier than you are now. We will never be here again.” One of the biggest misunderstandings humans hold about life is that we can secure things. Look close, and reality tells us this isn’t so. Everything is in constant motion — coming and going, being born and dying. Our fearful selves want to make this a problem, but it doesn’t have to be. It can instead become the impetus to see the preciousness of all of the ephemeral beauty we contact every day: people we care about, forests we love, our own aging face in the mirror. We are all living on the edge of death — and there is no way to ward it off forever. To keep this in mind as we write is to bring the intensity and reality of life’s preciousness into our work.

Under a dying tree…

Under a dying tree...

Toes in the earth…

Toes in the earth...

Return to the river…

Return to the river...